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WHOA! Tracked turtle sets record-long swim

WHOA! Tracked turtle sets record-long swim
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Ah, loggerhead turtle undertook the longest ever recorded journey of any tracked animal ever. Her name is Yoshi, and according to a recent block post by South Africa's Two Oceans Aquarium, she has traveled around 23,000 miles in the 26 months since her release in December 2017. The turtle began her journey in Cape Town, where she had been kept the past 20 years after being found injured by Japanese fishermen. Tracking shows air swimming around the southern tip of Africa across the Indian Ocean and now possibly towards Australia, which is home to turtle nesting beaches. ABC News Australia notes She may have wanted to return to our original hatching site to breed and nest.
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WHOA! Tracked turtle sets record-long swim
A loggerhead turtle named Yoshi has recorded the longest journey of a tracked animal.Yoshi, who was released after 20 years of captivity, had a lot of catching up to do.She proved it by traveling around 23,000 miles — from South Africa to Australia. Two Oceans Aquarium of South Africa released the over 400-pound creature back into the ocean in 2017.The aquarium noted it helped her recover from an injury to her side after a Japanese fishing vessel picked her up in 1997.Scientists told Australian Broadcasting Co. that she may have wound up there because she wanted to return to her original nesting area.

A loggerhead turtle named Yoshi has recorded the longest journey of a tracked animal.

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Yoshi, who was released after 20 years of captivity, had a lot of catching up to do.

She proved it by traveling around 23,000 miles — from South Africa to Australia.

Two Oceans Aquarium of South Africa released the over 400-pound creature back into the ocean in 2017.

The aquarium noted it helped her recover from an injury to her side after a Japanese fishing vessel picked her up in 1997.

Scientists told Australian Broadcasting Co. that she may have wound up there because she wanted to return to her original nesting area.