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'Disaster prepper' offers advice on coronavirus outbreak

'Disaster prepper' offers advice on coronavirus outbreak
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HE SAYS PREPPING FOR A PANDEMIC IS LIKE PREPPING FOR ANYTHING ELSE. HIS BIGGEST ADVICE, HAVE THINGS WITH SHELF LIFE, LIKE CANNED GOODS OR PASTA, THAT CAN LAST IN A CRISIS. >> I LOOK AT IT, IT’S COMMON SENSE. >> SURVIVAL PREPPING IS AN INTEREST THAT TURNED TO A LIFESTYLE. >> IF I ENDED UP CONFINED TO QUARTERS, MY FAMILY AND I WOULD BE FINE FOR QUITE SOME TIME. >> MONTHS, YEARS? >> DECADES. HE’S A DISASTER PREP CONSULTANT AND THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF PREPPER SURVIVAL GUIDE. HE’S WORKING 18-HOUR DAYS NOW, FIELDING INQUIRIES, ON T CORONAVIRUS AND ITS IMPACT. WHAT KIND OF CALLS ARE YOU GETTING FROM PEOPLE WHO MIGHT BE WORRIED ABOUT ALL THIS? >> I HAVE PEOPLE ASKING ME WHAT TO DO, WHAT SHOULD I STOCK UP ON, WHAT SHOULD I BUY AT THE STORE. I ALSO HAVE PEOPLE ASKING HOW BAD DO YOU THINK IT’S GOING TO GET. >> AND WHILE PREPPERS MAY SE EXTREME, HIS IDEAS ARE MUCH MORE PRACTICAL, AND IT STARTS HE SAYS, WITH WHAT’S IN YOUR CABINET. >> PREPPING FOR A PANDEMIC IS NO DIFFERENT THAN PREPPING FOR ANYTHING ELSE. YOU SHOULD HAVE ENOUGH FOOD IN YOUR HOME TO FEED YOUR FAMILY FOR AT LEAST A COUPLE OF WEEKS, IF NOT A COUPLE OF MONTHS. WE’RE NOT TALKING ABOUT BUYING A PALLETS WORTH OF CANNED BEETS OR A TON OF RIC JUST BUY A LITTLE BIT EXTRA OF WHAT YOU NORMALLY EAT. AND THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE I CAN GIVE ANYBODY IS, RELAX. JUST RELAX. TAKE A DEEP BREATH. IT IS GOING TO BE OK. THIS IS NOT AN END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT SITUATION. PATRICK: BEN, WE’VE HEARD ABOUT SPECIAL SURVIVAL FOOD. DID COBB MENTION ANYTHING ABOUT THAT >> HE DID. I ASKED HIM ABOUT IT. HE SAID YOU REALLY DON’T NEED IT. HE SAID LONG-TERM, THEY’RE EXPENSIVE AND NOT VERY HEA
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'Disaster prepper' offers advice on coronavirus outbreak
The term disaster or survival "prepper" may conjure images of bunkers or rations, but Jim Cobb says it is much more practical than you might think."(As) I look at it, it's common sense," Cobb said.Cobb is a disaster readiness consultant and the editor-in-chief of Prepper Survival Guide magazine. He said he has seen a spike in calls and emails about COVID-19, the coronavirus, and its impact. "I have people asking me what to do," Cobb said. "'What should I stock up on? What should I buy at the store?' I also have people asking me, 'How bad do you think it's going to get?'"Cobb's biggest piece of advice is to have at least a few weeks' worth of food on hand that will last."We're not talking about buying a pallet's worth of canned beets or a ton of rice. Just buy a little bit extra of what you normally eat," Cobb said.Cobb also cautions against special "survival food," which he said can be expensive and is not healthy in the long-term, he said.

The term disaster or survival "prepper" may conjure images of bunkers or rations, but Jim Cobb says it is much more practical than you might think.

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"(As) I look at it, it's common sense," Cobb said.

Cobb is a disaster readiness consultant and the editor-in-chief of Prepper Survival Guide magazine.

He said he has seen a spike in calls and emails about COVID-19, the coronavirus, and its impact.

"I have people asking me what to do," Cobb said. "'What should I stock up on? What should I buy at the store?' I also have people asking me, 'How bad do you think it's going to get?'"

Cobb's biggest piece of advice is to have at least a few weeks' worth of food on hand that will last.

"We're not talking about buying a pallet's worth of canned beets or a ton of rice. Just buy a little bit extra of what you normally eat," Cobb said.

Cobb also cautions against special "survival food," which he said can be expensive and is not healthy in the long-term, he said.